Child of the Sea

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Anonymous (not verified)
Child of the Sea
So I've ordered the study plans for this one. But I'm wondering if there is a similar design in that is about 28 to 30 feet.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
I don't think that kind of design is contemplated. if it was really like the child at 30' it would have less than sitting headroom and few people would consider that acceptable. The tiki 31 could be ethnicised with crab claw (it has the beams for it) and plank platform.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
Hi Glen, We used to have a Tiki 30 and last year bought plans to build a Tiki 46. We have decided to downsize to a Tiki 38 on the 'go smaller, go cheaper, go sooner' principle. We want to put a crab claw rig similar to Beat and Beatriz on Aluna. I've already been in touch with them and wanted to ask you a question. How do the standard beams need to be modified for the CC rig? Also, I've read Marchaj's great summary of his tests of the CC rig vs Bermuda, Oceanic Lateen, etc. I am impressed that such a low-stress, low aspect ratio rig delivers such drive. The fact that we can make and repair it ourselves for a reasonable amount of $$ is really the driving factor though. Any information you could pass on, given your considerable CC experience would be most appreciated. Thanks a lot. All the best, Bob
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
Hi Bob, I agree the crab claw offers amazing advantages for a rig that all but eliminates the ordinarily very heavy rigging cost. Hans klaar told me that there is also someone who rigged a t46 with cc and is very pleased. One thing about marchaj's results i think i understand now. the Arabic type lateen without boom didn't perform as well as oceanic. I think the reason is that the tilted up boom on cc forces the belly of the sail into a airfoil shape fullest in the front and flatter aft. In fact this may be the key reason for the rigs surprising performance. You don't need to modify the crossbeams because the compression load from cc is less than other rigs. Just create some kind of a simple mast step on the beam. I don't know where beat ended up putting his mizzen, whether he had to make some kind of support between beams. Crab claw still isn't for everyone. You have to be willing to experiment with something new. The small masts make the boat look tiny too which for the average yachtie would be unacceptable. Oh and you can't roller furl it...
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
Hi all, Beat stepped his mast on the beam on the aft end of the pod. He didn't alter the beams so that if he decided to switch he would be able to. David http://www.boatsmithfl.com
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
Hey David, Thanks for the info. The fact that we won't need to modify beams is good news. I have seen some of the videos of the Tiki 46 Wakataitea with the CC rig and it looks like it sails fairly well and is easily handled. If I'm not mistaken, they have only one mast with a huge CC sail. To keep the price down, (so we can get out on the water sooner and with more cash in our kitty), we are willing to experiment and not look quite so large.... On our Tiki 30 (which we did not build), we had no systems (electrical, plumbing, etc) to speak of and I spent more time messing with the jib furler than I did with our temperamental 8hp Honda outboard. Finances and inclination will force us to realize simple solutions to the usual problems. Thanks again, Bob
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
Hi Glenn, I just realized I thanked David and not you when I responded above. Thanks for your help and I hope your voyage is going well. Perhaps we'll have occasion to meet up in some far flung anchorage someday. All the best, Bob
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
The way I see it, if you use only one mast you need a jib to get through stays and then you should make the cc main boom horizontal. This is because a mainsail with a jib in front of it should not have an airfoil shape; the draft should be centered in the sail. This is the way Hans boat is rigged. The original Pahi 31 rig with cocked up boom breaks this rule though. Personally I don't believe I'll ever do without a mizzen again. For someone not depending on an engine it is invaluable. And it makes much better sense on cc because the mizzen fills in the space under the main.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
Agreed. We will dispense with the jib on our boat and go with main and mizzen cc sails. Beat and Beatriz are the Tiki 38 cc pioneers right now and we'll look forward to continued reports from them. The Lapita Children of the Sea look great in the new issue of SeaPeople. Bob
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
Hi, Having seen pictures of glenn's splendid cat, I'm amazed by the double crab claw. Looks beautiful and efficient. Is there any site or book giving accurate informations on how you rig and trim those sails ? I'm particularly interested in the way you change the geometry of the upper spar, from pointing fore to vertical and close to the mast. Thanks
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Child of the Sea
The only sites I've seen are pretty useless. The only book I know of is Building Outrigger Canoes by Gary Dirking but it has nothing on double canoes. The Wharrams, as usual, came up with unique ideas including tilting the sails to depower them. I don't think Beat and Beatriz do this. I find that it is a close hauled technique. Running Manu rere goes fast with small sails so rarely needs depowering. It is close hauled when she needs the right amount of sail. This is also when lowering the rig's aspect ratio and flattening the sails is effective in handling stronger conditions.
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