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Paddling canoe

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Anonymous (not verified)
Paddling canoe
In the Lapita Voyage video Hanneke had designed a small paddling outrigger canoe. Does anybody know anything about it? dimentions etc. I've enquired at JWD office but the lady there doesn't seem to know about it..
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Paddling canoe
Looks a lot like a melanesia, with its chines, except of course the single crossarm and marquesas style outrigger attachment. She got the single arm idea from me I'm proud to say then improved it with the slick attachment which I in turn copied on my canoe. I think its smaller than 16' melanesia perhaps 14' like mine, but I'm guessing.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Paddling canoe
Would you mind giving some insight on that particular design ? I need backup from people who actually used that kind of outrigger canoe, and what it's like casualy. I'd like to know if there is specific issues with a single crossarm, regarding : - stability - stiffness of the structure - overall strength when wind and waves are growing. - alongside hull torque (let say you go swimming, then climb aboard on the ama side, but near fore section, where the hull is not stayed by a iato ...) any help and comments would be greatly appreciated, thanks ! :D
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Paddling canoe
Two or more arms are stronger, stiffer, easier to construct and universal amoung pacific traditions. One arm is lighter and presents less windage so may be better for the smallest canoes. An arm has to be strong enough for a man to jump on, because they do if you leave the canoe lying around on beaches and wharves. This is excessivly strong and heavy for the canoe's function so using the minimum number is significant when it comes to picking the boat up and carrying it up the beach everyday. There are two specific structural advantages to more than one. -A larger ama may need more to hold it straight otherwise place greater demands on the connection. And when one arm bends the angle of the ama changes, which is not true with two arms. An OC1 doesn't need more than one. -When sailing, so going fast, and yanking the outrigger out of the water then submerging it, one arm is insufficient because the ama will pitchpole, or tumble, ending upside down. Won't happen paddling. You are right that there is a twist placed of the canoe around the outrigger attachment. The gunnels, the top edge of the hullsides, must be made strong enough, although this is important in all boats. My current one arm canoe falls short in this although I still climb out of the water on it as you describe nearly daily . This is an issue affecting all your bullets.
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