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Anti-Skid : Preferred Method

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Anonymous (not verified)
Anti-Skid : Preferred Method
coat of paint. while still wet, sprinkle glass beads on the paint. (you can get glass beads wherever marine paint is sold) when dry, another coat of paint to lock glass beads in.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Anti-Skid : Preferred Method
We mix Awl Grip's Griptex in with the paint and either roll or spray it on. We ad either to Awl craft 2000 or Petite Easypoxy. The Griptex comes in a fine and a coarse grade, we usually mix them 50/50. David [url]boatsmithfl.com[/url]
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Anti-Skid : Preferred Method
When I refinished my forward beam, I used Interlux's anti-skid material added to the last coat of paint for the horizontal surfaces. I note that at the big box stores, Behr's sells similar material for, no doubt, cheaper.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Anti-Skid : Preferred Method
After trying all the various products we have found the cheapest and best material for non skid is #70 quartz sand.--this is the super fine white sand you see in ash trays at the mall. A hundred pounds is 10 bucks here in Seattle, it wears better than anything else and will save you a lot of cash compared to buying the products available for sale. the method is as follows roll out the first nonskid area immediately begin sprinkling sand- be careful to sprinkle evenly as piles tend to suck up the paint. continue until the paint is completely covered up under the sand. repeat this on each area one at a time. let dry. come back and blast it with clean air--no oil in the line or compressor-- or fan or blow iit-just get all the loose stuff off roll on another coat one section at a time- bubbles will appear blow these away with your breath (blowing can often be a replacement for tipping with a brush in many situations) repeat coat after coat- double coat if the paint allows it. it isn't ready for the next coat if your finger leaves a print on the "dried" painted tape edges. also if your using interlux products with any blue pigment in them dont double coat, the blue pigments "float" to the surface during the longer cure time of a double coat. Usually it will take 4-5 coats with one part (less for two part paints) to fill any nonskid material properly, it must be filled until just the tips of the grit poke out. pull the tape when the last coat is dry but still uncured when you tape off the areas just tape the straight edges and then put a fat piece of tape accross the corner diagonally, draw the radius on the corner tape and use a razor to cut the radius. This is better than bending tape around a corner or using many little pieces-- fineline tape like they use in the auto industry will break once covered in nonskid. Cutting with a razor will leave a small shallow cut in the base layer at the radius, this will fill with paint, helping create a crisp edge that will last. All the products work-they're just more expensive, harder to use and dont last any longer.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Anti-Skid : Preferred Method
I got the #70 from a sand and gravel yard so I think they are refering to the seive size, but I'm not sure. It is extremely fine. I will ask them today as they are just accross the street, I'll let you know what I discover.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Anti-Skid : Preferred Method
The gravel yard said that #70 is .1mm to .2mm in grain size. It is the finnest sand they deal with, it is pure quartz. hope this helps Casey