Beaching a Tiki

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Anonymous (not verified)
Beaching a Tiki
I have recently bought a Tiki 38'. I am wondering if it is ok to put it on a gently sloping beach and let the tide go out to clean and inspect the hulls? Is there likelyhood of damaging the boat? [img]http://i275.photobucket.com/albums/jj310/CWinkie/IMG_3817600x400.jpg[/img]
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Beaching a Tiki
I have no experience with any of this, but I frequently see photos of people doing what you describe. Here, for example: http://www.wharram.eu/photos/index.cgi?mode=image&album=/Tiki-range/Tiki... So the answer is sure, probably. But you should let somebody who's done it before share their experience with you first - there are probably a lot of opportunities for big mistakes doing this. --Rich in CO, USA
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Beaching a Tiki
Was wondering if it could damage the rudders, they are only held on by rather small stainless steel pins. I will have a swim first and see if the sit lower than the rest of the boat. Thanks for the reply, appreciated.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Beaching a Tiki
We have dried out our Tiki 30 with no problems. Basically all wharrams can take the ground OK if they have been built to plan. The skegs should protect the rudders to some extent and if they lift off then they are not properly fixed on in the first place. What you should be aware of: 1. Always check where you are going to dry out before hand, ideally by walking on it when the tide is out, as you never know what lurks beneath the surface. 2. Dont forget that you may swing around whilst floating on/off 3. If I am going up a beach I drop an anchor on the way in to hold the sterns straight and give me something to pull off against. 4. Do not dry out if there is any prospect of a swell coming in as you will pound which is not a good thing. 5. If it is soft sand the keels will sink in to some extent, if you want to do a full inspection you need to have something solid to dry out on. 6. Make sure that the next tide is going to be high enough to float you off, ideally you want to work out how long you want to be dried out for, halve it and dry out that many hours before low water. The challenge is if there is a small tidal range - you do not want to end up neaped. Hope that helps Robert
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Beaching a Tiki
Excellent advice from Robert. . .I saw photos of a non-Wharram cat somewhere in Baja California beached for some work: the sailors also had a set of keel "shoes." They monitored the depth as the tide went out, and placed the shoes. Reversed the procedure as the tide came in.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Beaching a Tiki
Thank you Robert, thats a whole bunch of great advice. Just what I needed to hear! Cheers too Kim. Can someone explain to me what "keel shoes" would look like/be?
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Beaching a Tiki
Clogs for boats! :lol: In the case of a Wharram, a base with a vee-section on top to fit the hulls; two for each hull. Just large enough to do the job. To make sure they didn't float away, they could have lines pulled up and lashed to the topsides.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Beaching a Tiki
I beach my 38 regularly to clean the hulls, make adjustments, load gear, etc. My rudders are lashed on, but unless you're putting her bow's out, the skegs will ride in the sand not the rudders even as the water rises. Regards, Marc
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: Beaching a Tiki
We also regularly beach our Tiki 30. If you put blocks under it before the tide goes out you can reach more of the hulls. David http://www.boatsmithfl.com