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FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.

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Anonymous (not verified)
FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
Hi, Well the big day finally arrived, Sula 11 went to sea on Saturday for the first time since her renovation. We didn't shrink pushing her as I wanted to test everything ans see what would hold and what wouldn't. We pulled a small mooring cleat from the aft beam (Too small to hold the Main sail horse) Replacement on its way. We also had difficulty getting a really tight jib luff (braided rope halliard) and this must be addressed immediatly as it effects the ability to point quite considerably. THe main did not fly as intended and had flutter in the top third of the leech. This we could not correct. Has anyone converted to wire halliards ?? and if so, can you supply details ?? I don't want to give the impression I'm looking for a racing machine but proper seamanship demands theses details are correct and able to perform when the conditions demand it. So how was it ?? The boat sailed exceptionally well (except for the above) We had a force 4, 4.5 breeze for five hours and a 1 to 2 ft short swell . The GPS registered 10.6 Knts at one point, but there may have been a knot of tide in that. She averaged around 7 to 8 Knts most on the day. The jib sheets have a tendency to wrap around each other, but we can sort that out easily. She is very stable in the water at speed and gave no indication of windward hull lift even steering from the leeward hull. She is slow to come about in waves but the oppsite lock on the rudders will push her through when she picks up in reverse. She has a big turning circle, I scared the pants off a river mark at one stage and gave myself quite a fright. We had a 28ft Telstar (TRIMARAN) for company most of the time and he was taking very little out of us on the runs (Maybe a half knot) So with everything shipshape i reckon we should hold our own. These boats will throw water at you in any short of chop and even in flat water at speed, so its as well to wear waterproofs if the weather is cool , or very little if it's nice and warm. If, as Rory said, you are looking for the best of comfort, then a Tiki 21 is probably not the boat for you but having said that, it's probably the boat for me, Best Regards,, JACKIE.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
Hey Jackie sounds like you are rockin this Life on the Ocean Wave. I havn't really sailed this boat yet so I don't know for certain but in regard to your halyard selection i would go with something like Validator 2 http://www.samsonrope.com/index.cfm?ind=13&app=66&rope=94&inst=1 Vectran core is similar to Amsteel blue/Dyneema/Spectra or equivelant but with less creep, the polyester sheath provides a long life. Basically any polyester sheathed HMPE cored line would be excellent. "Dyneema and Spectra are gel spun through a spinneret to form oriented-strand synthetic fibers of UHMWPE, which have yield strengths as high as 2.4 GPa and density as low as 0.97 kg/l (for Dyneema SK75)[5]. High strength steels have comparable yield strengths, and low carbon steels have yield strengths much lower (around 0.5 GPa). Since steel has a density approximately equal to 7.8 kg/l, this gives strength/weight ratios for these materials in a range from 10 to 100 times higher than for steel. Strength to weight ratios for Dyneema are about 40% higher than for Aramid." check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyneema You can find these materials blended together with many other materials to suit various needs of Uv resistance, weight, strength abrasion, floation and water absorbtion ect. . For the Tiki's spinnaker sheets and adjustable tack I am using 2mm Ocean 3000 from Robline (12 strand urethane coated Dyneema SK75) -it weighs nothing. I feel that the proper selection of these lines can really transform your sailing experience without sacrificing the voyagers need for durability... sorry this so long- I kinda get going...
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
I'm thinking you won't want to pull very hard on a 2mm line of any material. Too little grip, too much pain. For light air spin sheets, maybe, but once it blows you need more meat. David
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
Jackie, Re the gaff outhaul, an old hand said this: raise the sail to a low point where you can see the gaff, haul the peak tight, then look at the top of the sail. If it is too tight (the outhaul), you can't peak it well enough. Loosen the outhaul and haul the peak halyard again: this should have the desired effect of tightening the upper leech. Fair winds, Kim
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
I agree- 2mm is pushing it, rather hard on the skin, but i wear gloves, and this particular sail is intended for the lightest of air. I am only trying to say that there is a line for every need and selecting the right cordage for the job makes a much better sailing experience than just buying a spool and using it for everything.
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
Hi Jackie, Welcome to the fun of Tiki sailing mate!! Its amazing how much tension the little sails on the Tiki 21 come under eh?? For my jib luff I use a 4 part block and tackle downhaul to get tension. I raise the jib to maximum hoist of the halyard, then I haul the tack down with my block and tackle. I have a 'loop' of line from the tack which goes thru' a block at the bottom of the forestay. The block and tackle has a hook that catches the looped tack line. It has worked well for me all these years - I can get any amount of luff tension I want on the jib. As I have different hanked on jibs, each jib has its' own looped tack line that quickly hooks into the downhaul when bent on. I'll see if I have a photo somewhere? I agree with Kim on gaff outhaul tension. Take the gaff in your hands and lift it to the raised angle at deck level so you can get a good look if there are any tight stress creases or loose bags. Again I can't stress enough how I get loads of peak halyard tension in moderate to strong breezes. When the sail is unsheeted there will be a ton of vertical creases running to the gaff top, but when sheeted on they all stretch out and she powers up like a beauty!! Have fun and experiment. You'll get her into the groove in no time. My house and dock is on the inner end of a 1500ft long canal. The canal is 100ft wide. Leaving for a sail is easy as its normally downwind, coming home is the fun challenge!! But the Tiki 21 can do it................best boats in the world!!! :lol:
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
trying to see if I can upload this photo of Cookie sailing. The downhaul block and tackle is attached to the big cleat on the fwd beam port hull. Hope this works??
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
trying to see if I can upload this photo of Cookie sailing. The downhaul block and tackle is attached to the big cleat on the fwd beam port hull. Hope this works??
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
Hi, Many thanks for all the posts, I went to the shop today and got all I think I need, I'll post again on the refinements and the performance when I've given it a good go. Thank you all for your comments and suggestions, it makes such a difference when you all chip in and give advice; I am more grateful than I can really express, With Great Regard, JACKIE. ,
Anonymous (not verified)
Re: FIRST SAIL TIKI 21.
Hi, I've sorted out the Jib tension as per Rory's suggestion, except I have brought the purchase to the bottom of the mast. I have replaced the trampoline with a doubled over "real live fishing net'' as per deep sea trawler, at a cost of 12 bucks, (Who wouldn't) I still have a little flutter in the top of the main, on the beat, but it disappears on the reach or down wind; that has me guessing. The wind wasn't as stong as the last sail, but we managed to knock an average of 6 to 7 knots out, ( As per GPS). The boat seems just as fast on the reach and downwind as on a beat. This I think has to do with the shape of the hulls and the lack of resistance. I did notice a build up of water aft as we ran downwind, between the rudders, just like a following wave, but as we were actually taking the waves on the Starboard bow, its really being generated by the boat itself. Has anyone else seen this ?? On a cautionary note, if you have bought a new GPS and are using it only to record speed; it might be as well to stick in a few waypoints while you are at it. (This might just help if you suddenly get enveloped in a sea mist with 20 yards visability). We anchored and had a good chat about how to find our way home. It worked out well in the end, but is not a pleasant feeling. I can now say I feel very, very secure in Sula 11 and she is now paying back all the hard work that went into her. Long may your Big Jibs draw, JACKIE.
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